Flashing Your Google Nexus 7 WiFi (2012)

In the next couple of days, I hope to have a comprehensive article posted on how to successfully ‘flash’ your tablet. (this will specifically be written for the above titled “Google Nexus 7 WiFi (2012) also known as ‘grouper’)

The Nexus 7 WiFi (2012)

The Nexus 7 WiFi (2012)

There is an awful lot of uncertainty wandering around on the interwebs concerning bricking your tablet with OTA updates. Over the past weeks, I’ve been successful going from KitKat 4.4.4 to 5.0 to 5.0.2 and finally to Lollipop 5.1. This isn’t to say all was perfect and I didn’t pull out a few hairs in the process, however, I was able to flash all of the above ROM’s using the sideload method from a Linux laptop.

On Saturday, I had enough of being without a rooted device. With Lollipop 5.1, and the SELinux read more

Linux, PPAPI, and the Browser…

In the beginning, was Lynx.  And, it was good.  The time was 1992.  Linux was in it’s infancy.  The Internet was becoming more easy to access.  Linux as we know it had reached a milestone.  It was now 1 year old.

I am going to cite some Linux history below to give perspective to why I wrote this article, and further explain my anger at Adobe and Microsoft.

The most popular web server has always been FLOSS since such data has been being collected. For example, Apache is the current #1 web server powering the Internet.  To my knowledge, it has never fell below this statistic.  Contrary to what Microsoft would have you believe, they have never held the number one position.  Ever.  Some current estimates put the number of Internet servers running Linux at or better than 95%.  Microsoft?  About 1%.  Ironically enough, Microsoft’s own Azure Cloud services offer “Linux Infrastructure as a Service” (IaaS).

According to the OSS/FLOSS Numbers Database, Windows NT actually crippled a U.S. Navy Cruiser in 1998.  Almost all of Europe’s governments use Linux in some form or fashion, or are in the process of converting existing systems including their educational institutions.  In the U.S. check out the statistics for banks, ATM machines, or mobile devices, or, for read more